[Clayart] artist sterotype

David Woof via Clayart clayart at lists.clayartworld.com
Mon Aug 4 10:40:36 EDT 2014


Hi Everyone, Hi Terrance,

It is indeed rare when teachers encourage students to consider art as a life choice.   Most would prefer to label the kid who exhibits the artists way of seeing and "disruptive" inquisitiveness as some sort of problem student, and pigeon hole them into what ever Federally funded program is currently hemorrhaging cash.

Aside from some rare but serendipitous cases, most people who make a life in the arts do so, not because of support and encouragement, but in spite of contrary best efforts of Parents, Teachers, and Community. (State)  

It was not always this way:  In every generation roughly three out of every hundred children born have the creative drive and artist's personality traits to the degree that they must create constructively; or go off to become destructive antisocial misfits. Either going inward to be destructive to self or outward toward society.  Our prisons and mental wards carry a higher percentage of these folks than the general population.  Prisons and mental facilities as an institutional population test at near 60% above average intelligence to genius while our general population outside hovers at 40%.  What a waste of potential gifts to society.  What with 60% of our outside population (dis)-functioning at below average intelligence to absolute stupid! Rant Rant!!!  No wonder more and more people resort to medications and distractions of all sorts.  The inmates are running the institution out here. (more Rant!!!)

But it was not always this way.   In indigenous cultures the world over, the clans looked for these children because their extended survival depended on them.   With roughly three out of a hundred, even in an extended family clan of thirty to fifty members there would be at least one every generation who would be taken to the shaman or otherwise social/spiritual leader and healer for training in the arts of that culture.    These people honored the artist, literally the "seer" who also served as the confidante and advisor to the organizational leaders.

In our time there is a resented jealously among "Creatives" and "Artsie Fartsies" who want that intangible ethereal "something" these truly gifted few have, and so many persons, parents, and entities, including many art teachers;(unwitting lackeys of the state,) and totalitarian governments attempt to beat it out of them or beat them down in fear of their ability to see clearly what's going on and their ability to communicate thru the Arts.

Lets ponder the framed painting, print, or drawing, as opposed to the unframed presentation who's gestural lines take us off the visual plane and out into the ethers of reality where all great ideas originate.   Who decided to contain art with-in a frame?
Was this by deliberate contrivance or simply innocent decorative furnishings?

The prosecution (or is it defense) rests.

David Woof
**********************************************************************************
Terrance said;<David;Sounds so familiar. I left formal school in grade nine. I was failing at all subjects except art. That subject saw 100% every report. Strange, the teachers did not notice this, and encourage me to go into the art field.

I also bounced about for two years, mostly on the streets. I finally enlisted into the military. Made a good career and with it, I studied art on my spare time. I have been a professional art creator for twenty years now, and I still enjoy the rush of trying out new ideas. 

We all have to find our way. Some people are lucky, they find their highway early.  Terrance.
******************************************************************************* 

> CC: ahoward at paragonweb.com
> From: zalt57 at yahoo.com
> Subject: Re: [Clayart] artist sterotype
> Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 19:50:36 -0400
> To: woofpots at hotmail.com; clayart at lists.clayartworld.com
> 
> David;
> 
> Sounds so familiar.  I left formal school in grade nine.  I was failing at all subjects except art.  That subject saw 100% every report.  Strange, the teachers did not notice this, and encourage me to go into the art field.
> 
> I also bounced about for two years, mostly on the streets.  I finally enlisted into the military.  Made a good career and with it, I studied art on my spare time.   I have been a professional art creator for twenty years now, and I still enjoy the rush of trying out new ideas.  
> 
> We all have to find our way.  Some people are lucky, they find their highway early.
> 
> Terrance. Almost finished with the bathroom renovations.
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> > On Aug 3, 2014, at 4:30 PM, David Woof via Clayart <clayart at lists.clayartworld.com> wrote:
> > 
> > I like the effortless effort concept also.  It is key how I learned or didn't learn in school.   If I had a teacher who could fire my interest and subsequently my imagination and then stepped back to give me room to explore, I sailed and excelled. On the other hand, attempting to burden me with home work on something that i had already understood and so chaffed to move on to the next related level always failed under the heavy handed admonition that to succeed one must "learn" to "work hard."  I preferred to "work" at what excited me so much that time fled and exhaustion set in without ever feeling like I was a peasant laboring in someone else's field.      Needless to say I "knocked around" a bit in my youth at a string of jobs and positions that I only "worked" while the fascination of learning and mastering lasted.   
> > 
> > In time I saw the pattern and understanding this led me to life choices and work that I have enjoyed.  It goes without much mention that we all must at times toil thru a spot needing application of personal fortitude and discipline, but the feeling of being trapped there with no light of freedom in sight to chose our next moves is an unimaginable travail. 
> > 
> > Experiencing the consciousness of this, I modeled my teaching methods for my students, and for my own children who are " working" in careers that excite that effortless effort.     
> > 
> > I feel most at home with the wheel spinning, or working on the latest sculpture.... hair standing on end, feet hardly feeling the ground, because I am so high on what I'm experiencing that I never want to come back.  Did I mention playful, playfully, or play. 
> > 
> > Arnold said:<Another way to look at play is effortless effort. I have been interested 
> > in that concept for decades. The highest form of work is through 
> > effortless effort, where work becomes play.>
> > 
> > David Woof
> > **************************************************************
> > 
> >> Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 17:30:29 -0500
> >> To: randall.moody at gmail.com; clayart at lists.clayartworld.com
> >> Subject: Re: [Clayart] artist sterotype
> >> From: clayart at lists.clayartworld.com
> >> 
> >>> On 7/31/2014 4:43 PM, Randall via Clayart wrote:
> >>> As to the idea of play, a person can
> >>> have a sense of play and still be serious about their art. That sense
> >>> of play many times is a sign of a deeper thought process than one
> >>> would think at first glance.
> >> 
> >> Another way to look at play is effortless effort. I have been interested 
> >> in that concept for decades. The highest form of work is through 
> >> effortless effort, where work becomes play.
> >> 
> >> Sincerely,
> >> 
> >> Arnold Howard
> >> Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA
> >> ahoward at paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com
> >> MAILMAN_MIMEDEFANG WRAP
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> Clayart mailing list
> >> Clayart at lists.clayartworld.com
> >> http://lists.clayartworld.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/clayart
> >> 
> >> MAILMAN_MIMEDEFANG
> >                         
> > MAILMAN_MIMEDEFANG WRAP
> > _______________________________________________
> > Clayart mailing list
> > Clayart at lists.clayartworld.com
> > http://lists.clayartworld.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/clayart
> > 
> > MAILMAN_MIMEDEFANG
 		 	   		  


More information about the Clayart mailing list