[Clayart] Etsy -

David Hendley david at farmpots.com
Fri Mar 28 19:59:36 EDT 2014


Etsy is ENTIRELY about networking, promoting, and etsy-marketing.
You will get next-to-nothing in sales if you simply open a storefront
and wait for customers to buy from you. Look up "pottery mug" on
etsy and about half-a-million selections will come up. No matter how
great your mugs are, very, very few people who don't already know
you, or about you, or know someone who knows you will find
you, much less buy from you.

I took the "no-marketing" approach and opened an etsy storefront
about 5 years ago. In 5 years, I've sold something like 7 pieces. In
the same time period, I've made hundreds of sales from my website.
Then there are the constant fees - it's 10 cents for 4 months for
everything you have for sale. I know, it's only 10 cents, but I've
spent probably 50% of what I've made from sales on etsy in listing
fees! They also take a percentage of each sale. It takes at least
half an hour to properly photograph and format for their
specifications each piece for sale, another time sinkhole.

So, I'm about done with etsy, I will stick with my own website.
To me it's virtual equivalent of the decision to sell at art fairs or
do your own sales at your studio or with friends. I would rather
put my time, money, and effort into promoting my own studio
sales rather than promoting an air festival. Likewise, it makes
more sense to me to direct people to my website rather then
to etsy. I know I could increase my etsy sales by joining a group,
creating "like lists' or "treasuries", but my time is better spent
doing other kinds of promotion.

David Hendley
david at farmpots.com
http://www.farmpots.com



----- Original Message ----- 
From: "jonathan byler" <jebyler2 at gmail.com>
To: <Clayart at lists.clayartworld.com>
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 11:26 AM
Subject: Re: [Clayart] Etsy -


> this is where networking, marketing, and making friends comes into play.
> I've never just skimmed etsy for things to buy, it is always work that I
> have found elsewhere, or been told about by a friend.
>
> On Mar 28, 2014, at 8:13 AM, Randall Moody <randall.moody at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> I think that the big problem with Etsy is that while there is some really
>> great work on it, there is also a sea of moderately bad to really bad to
>> horrid work on it. It takes a while to sift through the junk to find the
>> jewels.
>> I do think that it can be a great selling tool if you can get people to
>> your work, however.
>>




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