[Clayart] How to build a house with no tools- an archaeological perspective

Robert Harris via Clayart clayart at lists.clayartworld.com
Wed Oct 21 17:41:29 EDT 2015


If you go to his blog (primitivetechnology.wordpress.com) you'll get a bit
more information about his raison d'etre.

He also specifically said that this was not a house or shelter to live in
(he actually talks a bit about the engineering), but merely to showcase the
technologies.

He specifically refers to Korean underfloor heating as his inspiration.

I don't think he is trying to do experimental archaeology or to be
consistent with any one time period or geographical region, but rather to
show what is possible.



On Wed, Oct 21, 2015 at 10:56 AM, William Lucius via Clayart <
clayart at lists.clayartworld.com> wrote:

>
>
>
> I too was impressed, but I
> have never encountered such a strange mix of technology in my study of
> archaeological
> house structures.
>
>
>
>
> I would guess that he used iron
> poor earthenware clay that matured at the orange heat (800-900 C) he
> achieved
> with the simple updraft mud kiln. I would have expected more warping given
> the
> dimensions of the roof tiles. It was unclear what type (sand?) or how much
> aplastics he added. Near the end of the film the upper portion of the kiln
> exhibited a large vertical crack with an encircling fiber band to hold it
> together.
>
>
>
>
> I would suggest that the
> wooden structure would never pass a permit inspection given that the
> weight of
> the tile roof. From my replication experience the uprights should have
> been at
> least 12 inches in diameter and the cross-members at least half as big. And
> although he was shown cutting a mortise and tenon joint a lot of the wooden
> structure seems to rely on split hardwood lashings. Although encasing the
> uprights in a thick wall of clay with internal rock slabs would serve to
> stabilize
> the lower portion of the house, I would not sleep inside in fear of waking
> up
> dead. The roof structure is severely under engineered given the amount of
> effort expended.
>
>
>
>
> Overall, the replication
> exercise references a European Neolithic level of technology. In the
> opening
> scene he is shown hafting a stone axe and he also uses a range of stone
> woodworking tools. The kiln would be out of place in the Western
> Hemisphere and
> the idea of subfloor heating harkens back to Roman baths but without the
> slaves. A mica window would have made the finished house a bit less
> claustrophobic.
> I suppose that the gaps between the roof tiles would allow for exhaust of
> the smoke
> from pine resin lamp but in turn would allow for rain to drip through.
>
>
>
>
> “Maybe I’ve been influenced by the old Quakers who believed it was a moral
> question to consider what you’re leaving behind.  Why not?  It’s not a bad
> measure of a man – what he leaves behind.”
> William Least Heat Moon
>  Blue Highways: A Journey into America
>
> William A. Lucius, Ph.D.
>
> Independent Scholar
> Ceramic Analyst
> iacr at msn.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> MAILMAN_MIMEDEFANG WRAP
> _______________________________________________
> Clayart mailing list
> Clayart at lists.clayartworld.com
> http://lists.clayartworld.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/clayart
>
> MAILMAN_MIMEDEFANG
>



-- 
----------------------------------------------------



More information about the Clayart mailing list