[Clayart] an arty vessel adds pop to your countertop

Kathi kathi at lesueurclaywork.com
Tue Jan 12 20:11:40 EST 2016


There is a lot of junk on ETSY. There is also some fine pottery. Discerning buyers will find it. I've done VERY well on ETSY this year. But it requires a whole lot more than just throwing up images and waiting for the sales. My cost run about 10%. A whole lot less than wholesale.

Kathi

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 12, 2016, at 10:19 AM, Terrance (Terry) Lazaroff via Clayart <clayart at lists.clayartworld.com> wrote:
> 
> Hi Vince;
> You wrote:
> Anyone with the least bit of accomplishment in ceramics who wants to feel good about the work they are doing, just go to ETSY and enter handmade ceramics or handmade pottery in the subject line and you'll see PLENTY of work that will make you feel like an expert.  That's the problem with a venue like ETSY that allows completely unjuried access.
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> Here is my take on Etsy.
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> I was reluctant to start listing on Etsy.  When I opened my storefront, I decided to treat it like I was going fishing. 
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> I don’t mean that in a derogatory sense, (My clients are not fish,) but with the intension that one throws out their line, and waits for a fish to nosh. It is a joy to open my emails, and find that I have a bite.  
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> Sometimes it is just a nibble, meaning that I got favoured, or someone asked me a question about an item.  I don’t sell very much, especially these past four months. Flat-line. 
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> I have looked at the basic cost of selling on the Etsy, and other platforms, and found that the figures work out to basically those of selling wholesale, but without the drudgery of having to fill large orders.
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> Now don’t get me wrong. My Etsy prices are the same as what I sell on the street.  The net revenue is reduced due to the listing fees, the packaging material costs, the postage, the internet fees, and car trips to the post. 
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> Other reasons for reduced revenue occurs when I get the buyers that take advantage of the shipping times to charge back the sale, due to it not arriving within the specified dates, (and then, when the item does arrive, they just keep it.) 
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> Then there is the client who refuses to pay some local sales taxes or a broker fee, thus resulting in a refusal of the package, and as the shipper, I would have to pay for the return shipping, or to just let the post sell it off as unclaimed goods, (this is the way Canada Post works.)
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> There is also a buyer mentality that expects the seller to pay the shipping.  This is due to the big guys making contracts for cheap shipping with UPS, or the post office.  These benefits are not available to the little guy. The buyer also expects a return policy, without discussion. This happens because of remorse, or guilt of impulse buying.  It doesn’t take long to run up the



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