[Clayart] wiggly wire

Vince Pitelka vpitelka at dtccom.net
Fri Jul 15 18:32:25 EDT 2016


Hi Paul - 
I agree with your statement below.  I singled out Third-World and tribal
imagery and iconography because some people seem to think that those
cultures are fair game.  In reality, they are often more vulnerable and have
little recourse when someone copies their imagery/iconography for financial
gain.  
- Vince

Vince Pitelka
Appalachian Center for Craft
Tennessee Tech University
vpitelka at dtccom.net   



-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Gerhold [mailto:gerholdclay at gmail.com] 
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2016 2:35 PM
To: Clayart international pottery discussion forum
<clayart at lists.clayartworld.com>
Cc: Vince Pitelka <vpitelka at dtccom.net>
Subject: Re: [Clayart] wiggly wire

Vince,
It is interesting that you single out tribal or third world culture when you
say things like "when I refer to the misappropriation of cultural imagery/
iconography , I am talking about irresponsibly copying stuff that is the
original creation of a tribal or third world culture with no real
understanding"  This strikes me personally as somewhat patronizing as if for
some reason their imagery need more protection than first world imagery
which can also be  appropriated in a trivial way without any real
understanding.  

Perhaps I am reading you statement incorrectly but copying any cultural/
religious symbolism without understanding is the same whether the symbol is
first world, third world, tribal, or religious.

Paul



Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 14, 2016, at 10:39 PM, Vince Pitelka via Clayart
<clayart at lists.clayartworld.com> wrote:
> 
> Terry wrote:
> "It has been said that there is no virginity in art.   All most all modern
day imagery derives from someone else's culture or tribal beginnings.  If
anyone experiences other cultures, they will have this imagery in their tool
box of ideas."
> 
> Hi Terry - 
> I agree completely, but this really has nothing to do with what I wrote.
Being influenced by cultures, imagery, ideas, experiences is inevitable,
because we have to take in information and process it in order to produce
ideas or create.  When I refer to the misappropriation of cultural
imagery/iconography, I am talking about irresponsibly copying stuff that is
the original creation of a tribal or third-world culture with no real
understanding or appreciation of that culture.  There are no rules governing
things that aren't patented or copyrighted, but I just hope that people will
have a certain level of respect and common sense.  
> 
> I have often repeated a quote from Jazz trumpeter Clark Terry - "Imitate,
assimilate, innovate."  We often imitate something as a learning experience,
but then hopefully we assimilate the things that have affected us
positively, and then originate something new.
> - Vince
> 
> Vince Pitelka
> Appalachian Center for Craft
> Tennessee Tech University
> vpitelka at dtccom.net   
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Clayart mailing list
> Clayart at lists.clayartworld.com
> http://lists.clayartworld.com/mailman/listinfo/clayart
> 




More information about the Clayart mailing list