[Clayart] (no subject)

Ken Chase kchase235 at gmail.com
Fri Oct 14 10:26:03 EDT 2016


Thanks for the link. As having been a woodturner many years this was of particular
Interest to me.
Best,
Ken

Sent from my iPad

> On Oct 13, 2016, at 10:22 PM, Robert Harris <robertgharris at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Jim you obviously didn't pay attention to who actually wrote that post
> (me), or my second paragraph.
> 
> Turning the word was restricted to the use of a horizontal lathe used by
> production potters in Stoke on Trent etc.
> 
> For example here is an interesting video about using a (horizontal) pottery
> lathe made by Wedgewood in 1768.
> 
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-7twF5_chU
> 
> I would also like to point out that pottery was one of those things that
> the colonies were forced to import from England (no wonder there was a
> revolution). In theory (though no doubt it was much broken) making pots
> here was actually illegal at the time Wedgewood and co were exporting huge
> numbers of pots.
> 
> And if you think Wedgewood was any sort of nobleman who are merely
> displaying your narrow minded viewpoint of how things MUST have been.
> 
> I personally think that the use of "turning" in the US was probably
> introduced by French or German potters (who I think starting potting in
> Pennsylvania far before English potters) and was a direct translation from
> their own language, when they didn't know the English term.
> 
>> On Thu, Oct 13, 2016 at 10:46 AM, Jim Brown <jbrown1000 at gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>> "The "turn and burn" nomenclature is unique to the Southeast USA which is
>> where Jim's heritage comes from. Wedgewood (and the other UK potteries)
>> always threw and fired. (Throw, in this sense, comes from the Anglo Saxon
>> Threwan "to twist" and thus is a much older term)." - Jeff
>> 
>> So, you are saying that those poorly educated southern potters keep closer
>> to the original meaning of what they were doing than those highly educated
>> English noblemen?  :)
>> 
>> And one more question - what is the "Anglo Saxon" term for "turning"?  Just
>> askin'.  :)
>> 
>> 
>> *                       JIM BROWN*
>> 
>> *                 BROWN POTTERS*
>> 
>> *  "Making handmade pottery . . . *
>> 
>> *                                                . . . since the 1700's"  *
>>                   *   386 479-4515*
>> *            www.brownpotters.com <http://www.brownpotters.com>*
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> 
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