[Clayart] is your website stamped on your work?

David Woof woofpots at hotmail.com
Sat Jan 7 17:20:02 EST 2017


Hi Owen, all,

Owen said: " > At any rate, my original post was not aimed at the established potters. You guys already have figured out what works for you. Rather, it was meant to encourage all the brave folks who are deciding/trying to make a go of it as a potter to make it easy for their customers to find them. As you get going in your business, think about what makes sense to your customers and how to make it easy for them to purchase your wares.> Cheers, Owen> Owen Dearing, potter> Bend, Oregon


Owen your words speak volumes as to the generous and thoughtful spirit of you as a person.


I recall that in the early days of Clayart when "we" were concerned with welcoming, cherishing and educating beginners and "Newbies" as well as a forum for sharing information between the "advanced" professionals, "experts and gurus" so as to build Clayart to what it became that this same spirit was one of the driving forces. It still exists...let's keep it alive.  Good for you!


For my own reasons I took down my website when I moved to Oregon and have not yet "bothered" to build a new one because I don't need to for what I do. However as I view and interpret the world coming into 2017; the days of the unknown craftsman/woman are long past and from an entirely different and long dead culture.


What you are doing without argument works very well for you and you have here gotten good encouragement from people who's opinions we both respect, I'm sure, so I'll just say go for it, kudos and thanks for thinking of the newer ones exploring the idea that they can make it with "studio pottery."


In times past I marked an inventory code that told me date, series, clay body etc. along with a legible signature.  Now I have a simple clay body code with much the same effect.  It is a conversation starter when someone notices and asks. This simple inventory number along with the legible signature impresses patrons with my business attitude.

Folks who dig deeper into the wallet like to know you are serious and plan to be around in the future. At that time my sales were from the mailing list post card invitation and personally paid media advertisements re the art and craft fairs circuit.  E-mail lists were/are still ok but times are changing again and the bulk rate postage, well designed snail-mail post card is still a very productive method to actually put a personal invitation in a valued repeat patron's hand.

Printed address labels are ok but one should get out the list and hand write the persons name and perhaps a sincere one sentence personal note to let them know you remember and value them as a person and by extension a patron.


I could ramble on....but will close with;  A  tongue-in-cheek analogy: Before the earth environment changed to one with vegetation of manageable dimensions for humans, the gigantic vegetation of the dinosaur age had eventually converted Co2 to oxygen in such abundance that the diminutive brains of the dinosaurs couldn't adapt and so burned out and died.  Likewise the giant vegetation couldn't readily adapt to the changed atmospheric  Co2/oxygen ratio.


"Woof who'd'ju call a dionsaur?"  "no one, Rufus, no insult intended, but we all need to adapt and grow or die, intellectually, artistically, creatively, mentally, spiritually...well you get the point."


Misneach,


David Woof....timid salesmen have skinny kids!  ( Zig Zigler)

**************************************************************************

From: Clayart <clayart-bounces at lists.clayartworld.com> on behalf of Hank Murrow <hmurrow at efn.org>
Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2017 6:20 PM
To: Clayart international pottery discussion forum
Subject: Re: [Clayart] is your website stamped on your work?

Having seen the results from the kiln, and the orders that come in to Owen’s desk, I don’t find it strange that people are glad to ask directly for their mug, and equally glad that Owen will get all the $$ they send to him. It simply works, IMHO.

Cheers, Hank Murrow

> On Jan 5, 2017, at 10:25 AM, Owen Dearing <owen at mugrevolution.com> wrote:
>
> So now we are equating public restroom towel dispensers with handmade pottery. Can’t help but to feel just a little insulted by that analogy, David. :)
>
>> Owen, I am in no way disparaging your decision to stamp your website
>> on your pottery, but it's not for me.
>> For some reason, it reminds me of being in a public restroom and the
>> paper towel dispenser says "For reorders go to www.supertowel.com”<http://www.supertowel.com”>.
>
> The thing is, with your comment you are thinking about you the potter and what fits in to your sensibilities, I think. I am coming from a though process about making it easier for my customer to find me when they want more pottery.
>
>> On handmade pottery, it is just too eager and commercial sounding,
>> like the pots are coming off a conveyor belt and going right into
>> shipping boxes.
>
> Again, this is what David Hendley the potter thinks. I believe you have one of my mugs from nceca last year, David. Are you saying every time  you look at the stamped bottom you think of a big factory that is mass producing them? I doubt it. This is not necessarily what the buying public is thinking either. Nothing wrong with your sensibilities David, you have found a way to ID your wares in a way that meets your artistic and critical ideals. I have found one that works for me. I think that when folks order custom mugs from me and have to wait 2-3 months because I have so many orders in front of theirs, they get the idea that there is no conveyor belt set up in my little studio.
>
>> I am a firm believer in adequately marking and identifying pottery. For
>> me, this means I legibly sign the bottom of a pot with a sharpened stick
>> and stamp the name and location of my shop into the clay.
>
> It sounds like we both do the same thing in different ways. Truth be told, if you ever saw my handwriting you would beg me to use a stamp on the bottom of my pots for sake of legibility. :)
>
>> Anyone who wants to find me need only type my name or the name of
>> the shop into Google, Yahoo, or Bing, and my website will display at the
>> top of the results.
>>
>> David Hendley
>> david at farmpots.com
> http://www.farmpots.com <http://www.farmpots.com/>
>
> Also as a bonus, stamping my website address on my work enables a customer to go directly to my site without having to spend any time or effort to find it by using a search engine.
>
> At any rate, my original post was not aimed at the established potters. You guys already have figured out what works for you. Rather, it was meant to encourage all the brave folks who are deciding/trying to make a go of it as a potter to make it easy for their customers to find them. As you get going in your business, think about what makes sense to your customers and how to make it easy for them to purchase your wares.
>
> Cheers, Owen
>
> Owen Dearing, potter
> Bend, Oregon
>
>
>
>
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