[Clayart] Gloves and rotating equipment

Jeff Lawrence jefflawr at gmail.com
Wed Jan 11 15:57:49 EST 2017


>
> Dick: One additional thing I haven't seen mentioned Is that one should
> never wear gloves when using a grinder.   Jeff: What's the rationale:
>
Joe Herbert gave some examples of when it's a bad idea.

> The use of gloves when operating stationary rotating equipment, like bench
> grinders, pipe threaders, lathes, and others, presents a hazard because if
> the glove gets caught in the machine, the fingers surely follow.    In the
> case of bench grinders, many injuries occur when the gap between the tool
> rest and the wheel is too wide.   The tip of a glove finger gets drawn into
> the gap and then the finger and hand follow.  This is not a particularly
> uncommon occurrence.
>
Hi Joe,
That was a good round-up of situations where gloves are a bad idea. I
hadn't thought of a pipe threader since I've never used one. I never wear
gloves to work on a lathe, a vertical belt sander or a grinder with a tool
rest to avoid exactly the danger you and Dick point out.
I'd forgotten about tool rests since I've kept my grinder set up like a
buffer from when I was polishing engines. There's no tool rest, and only
half the wheel shield. In this setup, any contact pushes stuff
centrifugally away and I don't see a glove issue. Yes, I could certainly
still spear myself if I feed into the leading circumference but gloves
wouldn't help there.
I've become a much safer worker over the years as I've grown ever balder.

On Tue, Jan 10, 2017 at 9:39 PM, Joseph Herbert <joseph.herbert at att.net>
wrote:

> Dick wrote:
>
> One additional thing I haven't seen mentioned Is that one should never
> wear gloves when using a grinder.    Dick
>
>
>
> And then Jeff wrote:
>
>
>
> Hi Dick, Since I always wear gloves, preferring to flay other leather
> sources than my hands, this advice baffles me. What's the rationale?
>
> Best, Jeff
>
>
>
> Hello,
>
>
>
> The use of gloves when operating stationary rotating equipment, like bench
> grinders, pipe threaders, lathes, and others, presents a hazard because if
> the glove gets caught in the machine, the fingers surely follow.    In the
> case of bench grinders, many injuries occur when the gap between the tool
> rest and the wheel is too wide.   The tip of a glove finger gets drawn into
> the gap and then the finger and hand follow.  This is not a particularly
> uncommon occurrence.
>
>
>
> In the case of things like lathes and pipe threaders, the glove can wrap
> around the rotating work piece, catch under itself and pull the wearer into
> the machine.  Maintenance groups at power plants (where I perform training)
> often demand that all personnel wear gloves to perform any work – EXCEPT in
> cases where wearing gloves increases the hazard.  Stationary rotating
> equipment often presents those hazards.
>
>
>
> Slow rotating machines are not given enough credit for the dangers they
> present.  Pipe threaders that only turn a few rpm have seriously injured,
> and in at least one case killed, people.
>
>
>
> Whether or not you choose to wear gloves while operating rotating
> equipment should be an informed choice.  Pottery studios may get a pass
> because they are “art”.  Many of the things we do making pottery are
> industrial activities and industrial safety practices should be followed
> –artfully.
>
>
>
> Joe
>
>
>



-- 
Jeff Lawrence
jefflawr at gmail.com
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