Vince sez: "We don't have enough information on potters who have risen to
success in the 21st century to know how influential they will be. "

Another view perhaps, would be to direct the students to do a well-considered paper on the influence George Orr had on Robert Arneson and Clayton Bailey et. al.

And how this California influence has evolved to influence Modern domestic Studio Pottery expressions. 

Including Vince, your own personal evolution away from the table and kitchen ware you did in the Humbolt studio eons ago, to your larger "sculptural buckets, pitchers, and pots" that give an honoring nod to the utilitarian well they were drawn from.

Students working together in a studio influence each other as well.
If one would stop and think, one might ponder, why so many folks are hung up on hierarchical assessment of who was most successful, or influentially great? It is such a huge world of clay work and opportunity, relax and enjoy!!! 

Some presentations and assignments to students, if one breaks it down, are to satisfy the administration that you did something in class that they in the competitive Ivory Tower spirit can understand.    Like they never get much beyond learning how to "center" themselves on the toilet. And when they did take an obligatory Ceramics Class on pass/fail we gave them a pass as a professional courtesy.

In Morocco I met a potter throwing pots on an old wooden wagon wheel mounted on a wooden bearing stake driven into the ground.  He plopped the ball of clay on the central hub disc, gave the wheel a healthy spin and as the slightly wobbling wheel spun, he leaned over the ground level wheel and his body wobbled with it in a gracefully joyful dance as truly great vessels rose, formed, and grew large under the tutoring of his capable hands.
Out of respect that he had a living to make we didn't attempt to converse verbally, but with a nod and direct eye contact, our eyes spoke everything in recognition of what fellow potters need to say.

I like to think that our meeting was an encouraging relief from the not understanding hordes waving selfie sticks he had to endure each day.

Or the Potters of U.S. South East who dig their own clay and then make sure to fill in the freshly dug pit so the neighbors cow doesn't slip in and become mired.  Great and influential pots, sought all up and down the Coast, and down to earth folk art pots and jugs that are also influential in their own genre as well.

Too big is our world to allow ourselves to apprehend it in tunnel vision.

Misneach,
Woof.....................now my lyttle Muse form N. Carolina sez if I don't make her a set of face mugs and jug, she is a gone gal by morning!!!!...........I better get busy then, huh????......<(; >0)=}========<.................
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From: Clayart <clayart-bounces@lists.clayartworld.com> on behalf of vpitelka@dtccom.net <vpitelka@dtccom.net>
Sent: Friday, January 28, 2022 10:17 AM
To: 'Clayart international pottery discussion forum' <clayart@lists.clayartworld.com>
Subject: Re: [Clayart] top 20 list
 
This is devolving into a fiasco of favorite potters or "best" potters rather
than the twenty MOST INFLUENTIAL POTTERS of the past century, which is what
Jeff Weiland asked for.  And by influential, I am assuming Jeff means the
potters who had the greatest influence on the subsequent evolution of
utilitarian studio pottery (not sculptural vessels or pure sculpture).  And
if you are talking about the most influential on the evolution of
utilitarian clay, it lets out all the most recent potters, however wonderful
they are. 

My list is confined to the twenty potters who I think had the greatest
influence on American utilitarian studio pottery, because that's what I know
from my 30 years teaching ceramics in academia.  So please remember that
this is must my own opinion.  I'm selecting from throughout the 20th
century.  We don't have enough information on potters who have risen to
success in the 21st century to know how influential they will be. 

Adelaide Alsop Robineau, Charles Fergus Binns, George Ohr, F. Carlton Ball,
Bernard Leach, Michael Cardew, Val Cushing, Warren McKenzie, Toshiko
Takaezu, Ken Ferguson, David Shaner, Lucie Rie, Shoji Hamada, Robin Hopper,
Tom Coleman, Ellen Shankin, Jeff Oestreich, Linda Christianson, Randy
Johnston, Josh DeWeese.

Who have I left out?
- Vince

Vince Pitelka
Potter, Writer, Teacher
Chapel Hill, NC
vpitelka@dtccom.net
www.vincepitelka.com
https://chathamartistsguild.org/

-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart <clayart-bounces@lists.clayartworld.com> On Behalf Of Jeff
Weiland
Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2022 4:36 PM
To: Clayart international pottery discussion forum
<Clayart@lists.clayartworld.com>
Subject: [Clayart] top 20 list

I'm working on the curriculum for an advanced high school ceramics class. I
have a question...and wanted to start a debate!!!! I find great value in
learning from but not copying potters from years gone by. We already work
with porcelain and Chinese forms, earthenware and Greek forms, Native
American forms with slip decoration, and a few other cultures. What I want
to compile is a list of twenty or so most influential potter/artists, from
the past century or so, that I can use for research assignments. I have some
of my favorites like Reitz, Voulkos, Coleman, Troy, etc. Suggestions and
"why" would be welcomed. Variety is important.

Jeff Weiland
409 Blaine Street
Knightstown, IN 46148
765-345-2021
weiland@hrtc.net